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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the ranks of leadership of a civil rights group called the african national congress, the a.n.c. >> they were the revolutionaries of their day. they were the wild young men. >> teichner: former "time" magazine editor rick stengel spent countless hours in private conversation with mandela while collaborating on mandela's autobiography. >> mandela went to johannesburg as a young man and was treated in the terrible way that young black men were treated in the 1950s. i think this had a huge effect on him. >> teichner: mandela was in the forefront of growing resistance by the a.n.c., which began to protest the hated laws requiring blacks to carry passes, restricting where they could go. then, a galvanizing moment caught the world's attention. on march 21, 1960, in sharpeville, the peaceful civil rights movement was pierced with bullets. ( gunfire ) walter cronkite reported. >> police mounted on tanks opened fire. 69 natives were killed, 176 wounded. most of the victims were shot in the back. >> teichner: it was against this blood-red backdrop that nelson mandela took up arms. >>
about him and prayed for him all the years in prison. while the american civil rights movement was going on here in this country and here in los angeles. he came to visit the first ame churn only a few months after he was released from prison in south africa. they have pictures of him on the walls inside. it was a big moment for them here. we did get a chance earlier today to speak to one of the parishioners about meeting nelson mandela. >> i'll always remember that. what a blessing to meet this gentle man. more than anything in life, the one that taught us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive, but he told us to forgive. it's the most important asset of our life, to forgive and move on, yes. he is my hero. he is my papa. >> reporter: as you can tell, she, too, was born in aftrica bt been here for 27 years. they're remembering nelson mandela here today but remember him at the first ame church virtually forever. richelle. >> can you talk more about the special connection this church teams to nelson mandela? >> reporter: it's because he came here. his grandsons came her
, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guest, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from newyork, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend jesse jackso
, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guests, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. joining me charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend
thurners candles and stood with others praying for the civil rights leader. there were scenes like this across sfrikdz today. more now from al jazeera nick schifrin. >> nelson mandela talked about a rainbo nation. his struggle wasn't on behalf of black south africans but on behalf of all segregated and humiliated by racist rulers. >> nelson mandela wanted to build a nation united in diversity. citizens of all races and religion say mandela created that had unity. at an interfaith service, south africans celebrated the respect that mandela provided them. >> celebrate. it's an important model for human society. >> it lions us to be. >> down the road at an indian rally, man dela was thanked on behalf of children. 20 years ago, perussia was a second-class citizen. apartheid didn't only segregate blacks. >> we were part of the deprived lot. >> her husband suffered the same. he remembers being humiliated just for eating dinner. >> we used to go down in the evening to find something to eat. we had to say to the guy. sorry, do you sell to us? he would say, no we don't but you guys can go a
respects to a civil rights icon. how the family of nelson mandela is comforting mourners at his home. >>> and the cold snap, a warning for sierra drivers a and how long the freeze warning will last for the bay area. >>> nbc bay area news starts now. >>> good evening, i'm diane dwyer. and we start with a developing story, the 85-year-old palo alto man held in north korea is free tonight, back in the bay area. nbc's bay area kimberly terry has more on the newly released photo of him, kimberly? >> reporter: that is right, dianna, happy to be home, we want to show you the photo of merrill newman and his wife, happy at home. he says he is truly grateful for all the support he and his family have received during this ordeal. korean war veteran merrill newman arrived at san francisco international airport to a group of media. he held hands with his wife, lee, and his son, jeff, was beside him. >> good morning, i'm delighted to be home. i want to thank the swedish embassy in korea. >> reporter: he was released with humanitarian gesture, based on his age. >> it is a great homecoming, and i'm
for freedom. the music moved and motivated an embattled people. our civil rights movement had its music, but, in south africa, hundreds of songs rang out. >> ( singing "nanku" ) >> marsalis: "nanku," recorded by mariam makeba, kept alive the spirit of mandela and others locked up on robben island. >> the nation's feelings when those guys were all in jail was how much they missed them. ( sings "nangue" ) and it says they are all rotting in jail. while we need them here, they are all rotting in jail. >> ♪ nan gue nanque nangue, mandela oh, my africa. ♪ >> you know, nobody had seen him since the 1960s. by the '80s, you were not allowed to say his name in south africa. ♪ >> marsalis: in the mid 1980s, hugh was far from home, making music in botswana when nelson mandela reached out to him. in 1985, he was still incarcerated. he took the time to write you a letter on your birthday. >> he just had this letter smuggled out of prison. here's a guy who's been in jail for 20 years, but he's writing to me, giving me encouragement. i just stood there and said, "wow," and i then went to the piano an
the apartheid fight, the fight to end apartheid was their civil rights struggle that they were able to emotionally connect to. >> remembering mandela, you'll be talking about that on "meet the press" coming up at 10:30 here on nbc 4. thank you so much, david. >> all right, guys. good to see you. >> we continue to stay on top of our wintry weather that has made its with an he he to our area. >> let's check in with chuck. >> vj and i are in the storm center, keeping track of every flake as it comes down across the area. a lot more flakes coming up this morning into today. we're all worried about the we're all worried about the chanceuse chase freedom atselecs and get 5% cash back this quarter. so you can give her an even bigger surprise. activate your 5% cash back at chase.com/freedom chase. so you can. live pictures now outside the u.s. capital. you can really make out those big fat snowflakes coming down there. pretty impressive. >> we want to take you over to the white house. seeing a lot of white around here as well, steady flow of snowflakes making their way down. pretty picture.
the american years of civil rights struggle, and in those years when he was in prison they felt a connection to him which was completed when he actually came here in 1990. so you can imagine what a wonderful moment that was for him. so it's a special thing for him. there is a service dedicated to nelson mandela at 10:00 ot here this morning. of course they will be remembering him all day and for many years to come. we spoke to the senior pastor here just a little while ago. >> it is awfully difficult to memorialize because a memorial would be life lock for all of us, for the next four, five generations. because a person of his character, a person of his statute and commitment -- stature, will have a clear record of what he's done and i think his life will be much larger and much more impactful, in ten, 15, 15, 20, 25, 30 years now as it has been in the last ten, 15 years. >> they tell me that the night nelson mandela was released from prison in south africa they prayed here at the church all night long and when they got the news that he was released the whole place broke out into cheers. >>
they send their kids to school. a pastor says school choice is a civil rights issue. he might be right. we are part of the country that tries school choice as benefits, especially minorities. too much the government says here is a school in your district, it is failing, tough luck. people in detroit have had enough of this. 80% percent of the parents in detroit would have enough choice would take another choice. families want the freedom to choose to send their kids were they would like to send them. i want them to have as many choices as possible. i live where public schools are good. my kids are sent to the public high school in kentucky. in my county, my kids can choose from five different schools. they have to compete with each other. i cannot understand how anyone could be against competition, empowering parents with choice. the freedom to innovate is important. charter schools get rid of this top-down approach, one-size-fits-all. study showed charter kids learn more material than their counterparts. opponents of school choice complained and say that is government money. you sent gove
of civil rights movement. finally, he walked out of prison, to thunderous applause. four years later he was elected south africa's first black president. let's exam the man behind that status. our first guest had a strong personal connection to nelson mandela. he taught him and his grandmother visited the south african leadner prison. he joins us from massachusets, really a pleasure to be with you. thank you for joining us, i know you are the headmaster of the great tan school, and really very glad that you took time on what must be a hard day for you, given how many family connections you have and the fact you knew him yourself. >> thank you for having me, and i thank god for letting me live to come here. so i think the man himself would love -- ould have loved for me to be here. >> now, tell me about your family and the connections? >> mandela was a man of humility, so it is hard to talk about my family. my grandfather taught nelson mandela in college. they belonged to the same organization the a.n.c. my grandfather was also a political leader within the anc. my grandmother -- yes, go
the people of his own homeland and those that worked for freedom and civil rights across the world. many offer tribe utes that somehow seem to full short of describing nelson mandela, so we began with the great man's own words, the ones we will all remember of him. "dif", he once wrote to his wife, "break some men, but make others. real leaders must be willing to sacrifices all for the freedom of their people. i can rest only for a moment for with freedom come responsibilities, and i dare not linger for my long walk is not yet ended." >> but that long walk came to an end. tribeauts been pouring in. those who knew him or who are inspired by his struggle: >> our correspondent had a story from new orleans, a restaurant that offered an unforgettable meal. >> this is a flag. >> of all the meals prepared the a simple dish. >> i'm speechless thinking about it. >> markets were mauritious worked in the cape town hotel. >> i was there at the right time. i had the privilege to cook mr nelson mandela's first meal out of imprisonment. they were there to discuss negotiations for his relief. >> 3 o'clo
. >> schieffer: did john lewis, one of the heroes of the american civil rights movement, mandela will always be the great teacher. >> nelson mandela, this one man, taught all of us how to live, how not to become bitter. someone who can go to priss son and stay all those years and come out so free. not hating anyone, not putting anyone down. i wish we had a few nelson mandelas in america, or maybe a few more in the world to point us to the best part of our human spirit. >> schieffer: there are many heroes who by a single act or decision have changed history or at least their time. to me what sets nelson mandela apart is that his whole life was a lesson. a lessen in courage, perseverance, patience, bravery and finally forgiveness and redemption. that is rare. over the next 40 years what's the healthiest and best way for them to grow so that they really become cauldrons of prosperity and cities of opportunity? what we have found is that if that family is moved into safe, clean affordable housing, places that have access to great school systems, access to jobs and multiple transportation modes
. >> reporter: civil rights lawyer george bizos was mandela's attorney and friend. >> he was an example to the people of south africa, to the people of africa, to the people of the world as to how authorities is to be exercised. >> reporter: almost 60 heads of state including president barack obama and most of the living former u.s. presidents will attend mandela's memorial and funeral services this week. from a massive ceremony at a johannesburg stadium tuesday to lying in state in the capitol pretoria to burial next sunday in his ancestral village in the eastern cape province, it's expected to be one of the largest global gatherings in recent history. >>> you say 11,000 -- >> 11,000 troops have been deployed. >> reporter: defense minister nosiviwe mapisa-nqakula is overseeing security. she says soldier, the air force, national and city police all are being deployed to control and protect tens of thousands of mourners. >> this is a test for us. and we know that and believe that people will be watching how south africa perform. >> today a south african's pray, they also worry, the show
in charge. we saw that here in this country post-civil rights movement where -- there's a wonderful book i think about often about a small town and southern georgia, the civil rights movement came late to the county and those who sort of really were in opposition to the sheriff and ultimate power, how difficult, difficulty they had once they had any kind of power. and so i guess i wonder why, what happened? >> it's the big question in a place like this. obviously, people came back from 30 years in exile come in the case of the successor to nelson mandela in 1999. mostly living in london. and all of a sudden in charge of running a country that he didn't know that he left as a young man of 19, coming back and needing to run the place that was bankrupt the he described former president described walking into the office in union buildings after being sworn in and finding nothing. no computers, no pencils, no pins. no paper, and which to manage this developing country. so i think part of it is that that generation came back from exile to a country they did know. and that the presidency is in ha
. stateside, a yuounger generatio of american civil rights leaders is reflecting on the legacy of the man and how he inspired them. one of them downing me now from washington, d.c. former president and ceo of the naacp, ben jellis. i'd like to know when nelson mandela first got on your radar. what was the first context in which you learned about him and when you first saw him in person. >> you know, the first conversation was with my mom explaining to me why we couldn't drink coke and we couldn't get gas from the shell station and really talking about how similar the struggle that was happening then in south africa was to what she had gone through as a young person in this country. the first time i saw him was he was doing a tour when he got out of prison. it was 1989. he came to the coliseum in the east bay. i and tens of thousands of people were all gathered there. i recall pushing my way up to the front. you know, for us, we were used to having black leaders assassinated in their prime and spending the rest of our lives wondering what could have been, what would have been. and with him
, but my opinion is that we're talking about a civil rights issue, and my opinion is that outside the school, they are getting a message, the opposite one, the one that i just said about their work and about what the country believes in them because this is about achieving gaps in intercity, low income, african-american, and hispanic, and closing the gap with the white suburban counterparts so telling them the opposite message in the school that they are in to overcome the the message they get outside the house. >> well, separate by equal, illegal, unconstitutional now, and how do these kids, say, 9th grade, and say north phillie, how did they get the message that's wrong? when they walk into a classroom because they have to go, they have to go to school. their parents get them ready for school, they get their clothes together and hopefully they have breakfast. they go to school. what are the signals they get that say you're infear your? that you're not beginning to get anything from this? what's the thing you try to fight as you get into trying to make education work? what's the
. for our president to be so moved by mandela, to really have his own place in a civil rights struggle against apartheid. >> when it comes to president obama's presence on the international stage this potential for comprehensive agreement with iran yesterday. it could be worse. when it comes to the international stage how is his capital? >> i don't think it is exceedingly high. i think a lot of american allies think america has lost its nerve in some regard particularly when it comes to confronting iran. i think there is difficulty with our credibility because our economic standing has impact as well. it doesn't diminish america's power and influence in the world. >> how much focus for president obama in terms of international? it isn't just iran? >> it is looking so difficult. as you look towards next year disengaging from afghanistan becomes the story. iran becomes the big test. no one knows whether iran will do what president obama wants it to do which is basically dismantle any pretense. >> nice to have you here. we'll see you a little bit laterer. a little bit later. >>> we vel a
of the most influential leaders and revolutionaries. along with our own civil rights leader dr. martin luther king, junior. among others on the list, presidents theodore roosevelt and ronald reagan, winston churchill and margaret thatcher, pope john paul ii and israel's first prime minister david bengoria. adolph hitler and mao. "time" went on to name the last century's three greatest people. >> the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> osgood: runner up for franklin d. roosevelt and muhammad gandhi who led india's campaign against british colonialism. >> it is complete independence that we want. >> ghandi inspired among many others, nelson mandela who praised him in an essay for "time." growth ghandi and i suffered colonial oppression, and both of us mobilized our respected peoples against government, is that violated our freedoms. when it came to choosing the greatest figure of the 20th century, "time" looked beyond politics to choose albert einstein, the scientist who derived the equation e equals mc squared. a choice defended by walter isaacson. >> he said politics is for the mome
in the civil rights struggle against apartheid i think makes it very meaningful. his presence will be significant. >> when it comes to president obama's presence on the international stage, we know he's talking about this potential for comprehensive agreement with iran yesterday. he said it's 50/50 or, frankly, it could be worse. his approval numbers very low here. when it comes to the international stage, how is his capital right now? >> i don't think it's exceedingly high. i think a lot of america's allies, particularly in the middle east from israel to some of the gulf countries think america has lost its nerve in some regard, particularly when it comes to confronting iran. so i think there is some difficulty with ourbili because our economic standing has some impact as well. it doesn't diminish america's overall power in the world and america's real influence in the world. that is still very, very strong, even if some people have doubts about president obama. >> how much of a focus is there for president obama in terms of international, seg tear hagel making his way to afg
with luis. she also became very interested in civil rights. we have a problem at that time was a white supremacist group in town, and she held a group of people lobby to get a unanimous vote in the legislature for a law allowing civil damages for civil harassment. that brought an end to that white supremacist compound that gave coeur d'alene a pretty bad name sometimes. she didn't want anyone to be known for that. at one point people and urged her to for governor, and share the name recognition. she had the people behind or. she had a lot of the things that any of the politicians would want, and she knew it. but she didn't. she chose not to. for several reasons, and i talk about them in the book but i think the biggest, she was not one to say her own name over and over. she preferred to work behind the scenes. and became one of those people that worked in the senator's office, and the congressman's office, the governor's office, to get things done outside the political fight. i came here 20 years ago to be the pastor of her church. i count in the book some interesting little stories. o
st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights, and prison reform as its foundation. no one's life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of an out-of-control war on drugs. mandatory minimum sentences that force judges to give 10, 20, sometimes 50 year sentences for drug offenses are crazy and they've got to end. it is a human tragedy. it is an idea of justice. and there need to be new voices from either party that will say it's time to change. this is whay i've joined with democrats on this. [applause] i've joined with democrats on this. i'm working with senator leahy from vermont to try to give junls more freedom, more leeway when it comes to sentencing. if it were your kid would you want to know whether it was their first crime? whether there's a chance to rehabilitate
's about civil rights. >> dave? >> this is the mood certainly in maryland and parts of the you state to be more welcoming, more open, gay marriage, the revolution and thinking on gay people and people who have other issues in that regard -- not issues, but transgenders, people like that. just another move in the direction. hyattsville today could be a lot of other cities tomorrow. >> i tend to agree. i don't think there's -- it's notable that this step has been taken. but unless it leads to a larger, more broader sort of conversation about discrimination generally, it may just be something localized. this is the kind of thing i expect out of tacoma park. surprised that hyatts vilville took -- >> i like people that call it park. >> discrimination is discrimination. >> dave mcconnell, jerry. thank you for being with us. i'm pat lawson muse. that's it for reporter's notebook. news 4 today continues. >>> we're keeping close watch on a winter storm. a live look over the potomac river right now at 6:30, courtesy of our camera at national harbor. even though it's along the water, it's one o
's human rights chief has evidence that syrian government officials have committed crimes against humanity. she called on the international criminal court to open a probe into the civil war. she said responsibility for atrocities committed in the searing conflict extended to the top echelon of government, including president bashar al- assad. brewers started lobbying for a year unity lot. they are hope -- a beer unity law. in 1516, the bearberry and ruler decreed beer could only be made with water, malt, hops, and yeast and nothing else. there was relative calm on the streets of the thai capital after days of angry protests. police itrs and should can says the government took steps to calm a dangerous escalation of violence. police were ordered to stand back as demonstrators calling for the resignation of the to entert were allowed government compounds and tear down barricades outside of the police headquarters. i ask the business community and all people, including the protesters, to unite and reform our country under the king. the protestant leader insists the prime minister must resign
of civil war in 2005. he denied there was any rift with his deputy. we have more from the sudanese capital. what has happened is a senior generalwho is a right hand man of the president has replaced him. it's important how the government sees it's need to maintain power it's a form of co-oco-opting him into power. it's kind of secured it in that sense. it's not clear how even if there are new faces in the government with the same old policies whether or not it will make a difference to being able to han handle the economic crisis this country faces. that is eric martin in car to k. >>> the u.s. says he is a war veteran. glorchlts th-9dthe saga for for. >> when merl newman made the trip to south korea he wouldn't know how difficult it b it wouln out. he is now back in the u.s. beside his wife with a message. >> it was a great homecoming and i'm tired and i'm with my family now. thank you all for the support we got and very much appreciate it. >> newman was a soldier in the korean war and his visit was a long planned vacation down memory lane. he was no orland ordinary soldi. the south korea
people who make the civil war chest set or whatever. right? it's like a lead list. >> it's for your own good. >> the "los angeles times" piece says they were shocked. they didn't even complete the application process and they were getting phone calls. take heart in peter levy. he says, i can imagine some people may be upset but i can see some people will be comforted and relieved to get help navigating the website. >> your average sleazy marketer knows he's a sleazy marketer operating over a space above a starbucks. these people are doing it because they feel they have a moral right to do it. you ought to be grateful they're giving away your information to no one you've never heard of. >> it's okay for big government to do it but not mom and pop shops who have to adhere to the do not call list. >> or the do not e-mail list or canned spam act. >> it doesn't apply to the government. >> it's all because they're trying to make their deadline. that's the arg gurmt that cover california is making, too, hey, we have these deadlines for enrollment numbers and we're behind schedule so we have to
joe has really led to the most exciting three hours that you can find on television every day in civil discourse and a place where people can really get a lot of different points of view. let's figure out the room. first of all how many republicans here today, looking for the right path? >> we have got a few. >> how many democrats? c. yeah. >> it's "msnbc." >> how many independents max? this is our show. this is morning joe lies. >> it really is. it's all about friday, friday of independence and it starts with an mika and myself. as you know i'm a conservative from the deep south and mika is a liberal from the northeast. make a's dad is very excited rand u.s. foreign policy for years. [applause] you may be familiar with my dad's work to matt. he ran little league baseball. [applause] i was raised in the southern baptist church across the deep south and he of course was raised as a young marxist in the greater manhattan area. >> thank you very much. how many republicans voted for obama here? >> nobody's going to admit that. >> stand up. stand up. show yourself proudly. [applause] i didn
finding the right way. we're a little colony on the outskirts of western civilization, and we produce in the 18th century the greatest generation of political geniuses ever assembled on earth to produce a constitution that has given us a republic that has endured longer than any in the history of man kind. mankind. in the 19th century, we are a country that needs a lincoln, and a lincoln arises. in the '20s during the depression and to lead us in the second world war, we find be our fdr. and in the second half, we find our reagan. this is not to say that we will always be able to find our way. but there is something about the american spirit, about the bedrock decency and common sense of the american that seems to help us find our way, and we do. and if that isn't enough to cheer you up, i will leave you with a remark, a comment of my favorite pundit, ott to von -- otto von business mark, not generally known for punditry. [laughter] generally known for invading other countries. [laughter] successfully. [laughter] who once actually said god looks after children, fools, drunkards and th
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)